• By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Monday 30th July, 2012

Can an obesity prevention program prevent bulimia – and pay for itself?

Planet Health, a school curriculum promoting good nutrition and physical activity, is known to reduce both obesity and eating disorders. Now a new analysis estimates that the intervention may even save money by preventing teenage girls from developing bulimia.Bulimia nervosa (BN), commonly called bulimia, is a serious eating disorder that can be characterized by binge eating and purging or eating…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Wednesday 25th July, 2012

What is CIRC – and where does it work?

The effectiveness of the Cooperative Integrated Reading and Composition (CIRC) program is contested. On the positive side, CIRC has been identified as one of 19 effective early intervention programs by the UK Government-commissioned Allen review, and was rated as a “good enough” intervention by the Evidence2Success initiative. In contrast, however, the US Department of Education’s What Works…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Monday 23rd July, 2012

ExCELL-ent Teachers = Excellent Pre-readers

A professional development program for teachers of at-risk preschoolers relies on the idea that supported teachers equal supported students – and it works, a recent study finds. When preschool teachers learn how to improve their language and literacy instruction, children from low-income families benefit.In a randomized controlled trial, teachers at three Head Start centers were assigned either…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Friday 20th July, 2012

Changing challenges

A doubling in the proportion of young people reporting frequent feelings of depression or anxiety is among the findings in a recent Nuffield Foundation report.The figures rose from three to six per cent for boys, and from 10 to 20 per cent for girls between 1974 and 1999. Over the same period, the number of parents reporting behavioral problems among their children also doubled, increasing from se…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Wednesday 18th July, 2012

Inspiration from a decade of developments in prevention science

In 2003, the US National Institutes of Health announced a new priority: “translational research.” As one of the nation’s largest funding bodies of social science research, when the NIH threw its considerable weight behind prevention interventions and dissemination, it helped to accelerate the work that was already taking place in the field. And the NIH’s call to action was only one of seve…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Monday 16th July, 2012

Beyond the "Three Rs"

A return to “traditional teaching” – with its emphasis on maths, English and frequent testing – is the invariable promise of politicians pledging to improve academic standards. But can academic standards be improved instead by strengthening children’s social and emotional well-being? New research by a team from Cambridge Assessment, UK, suggests that it can. The study looked at whether e…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Thursday 12th July, 2012

No easy wins #2 #2

Twenty-eight per cent of families with young children in Britain – amounting to an estimated 192,000 children under the age of one – face two or more “risks,” such as parental drug or alcohol misuse, unemployment or mental ill health, suggests a new analysis of national data which looks at the prevalence of those factors.Two or more risks is the level at which other studies have suggested…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Monday 09th July, 2012

Prevention science – All is revealed

Prevention science is a relatively young field that has developed rapidly over the last 40 years. In 2005 the Society for Prevention Research commissioned a taskforce to develop a definition of prevention science and set out specific training needs for future prevention researchers. The resulting report, Standards of Knowledge for the Science of Prevention, offers an insight into who prevention sc…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Friday 06th July, 2012

Making OCD diagnosis “faster and more accurate”

Few adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder get the help they need, even though effective treatments for OCD in adolescents exist – and part of the problem is underdetection.OCD is often inherently difficult to diagnose, because it resembles other disorders and often appears in combination with other disorders. But a second issue is the time required for clinicians to make an accurate ass…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Wednesday 04th July, 2012

When physical health is not looked after

We know that looked-after children and young people face greater risks of mental health and behavior difficulties than do those in the general population, but there has been little exploration of the relationship between these problems and children’s physical health. However, research from Florida suggests that the link might be stronger than is often realized. This means that it is possible tha…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Tuesday 03rd July, 2012

Nipping Trauma in the bud

An estimated 60 per cent of children experience some form of potentially traumatic event or circumstance at some point in their development, according to US studies, and six to 20 per cent of them go on to suffer some form of impairment or post-traumatic stress disorder.What may provoke this includes maltreatment, exposure to violence, or serious intentional or unintentional injury. Until now ther…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Monday 02nd July, 2012

Taking self-control of the future

From a very early age, children are encouraged to learn to regulate their behavior. Parents try to teach their children not to have a tantrum when they’re upset, to wait for things rather than expecting them straight away, to think before acting, and to respond to frustration without aggression. Although this learning process is difficult for both children and parents, recent research indicates…

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