• By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Friday 27th February, 2009

Learning how to kill the kitten

To anyone 350 years old, or familiar for other reasons with conditions at the birth of modern science, today’s preoccupation with the travails of translational research - how to get efficacious programs into effective practice – may sound like a reverse.Today the journey begins with a laboratory solution and ends in the messy complexity of everyday life. Back in 1661, in the chambers of The Ro…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Thursday 26th February, 2009

How disadvantaged you feel hurts children more than poverty

A child’s behavior may be affected as much by parents’ perceptions of the disadvantaged neighborhoods where they live and their resulting sense of belonging as by any more tangible everyday experience.The finding comes from research published this month in Children and Youth Services Review which attempts to improve understanding of the complex relationship between deprived neighborhoods and p…

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  • By Dartington SRU
  • Posted on Wednesday 25th February, 2009

Fathers also feel the long-term strain of young parenthood

An association between teenage motherhood and an increased risk of heart disease in later life is likely to have less to do with the biological impact of pregnancy than with lifestyle, a new report from the UK Medical Research Council suggests. Rebecca Hardy’s study is believed to have been the first to examine the risks for teenage fathers as well as mothers. It found elevated risks for both. H…

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  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Wednesday 04th February, 2009

Triple P evidence supports radical rethink on child protection

Most countries have systems for detecting and dealing with concerns about child abuse. Anyone worried that a child may be being harmed can alert a social worker who will judge the best response. It can be anything from deciding that no action is needed to invoking legal powers to remove a child to safer care.It sounds sensible enough. But the benefits will always be limited. There is more child ab…

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  • By Sarah Blower
  • Posted on Wednesday 04th February, 2009

For positive parenting read also positive practice

Triple P originator Matt Sanderss visit to Birmingham, one of the programs key UK pilot sites, has coincided with the publication by the Childrens Society of a report, which, rather as a UNICEF report did two years ago, points to the relatively poor state of UK childrens well-being among Western nations.The Childrens Society has urged UK policy makers, practitioners and the population at large to…

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  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Wednesday 04th February, 2009

How is needs assessment measuring up?

Before distributing scarce resources for childrens services, it makes obvious sense to try to measure childrens needs. It helps to establish priorities and shape the services, and provides baseline data against which to assess effectiveness. In England and Wales, furthermore, local authorities are required by law to determine the nature and extent of childrens needs in their areas. So how are they…

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  • By Kevin Mount
  • Posted on Monday 02nd February, 2009

Helping schools to be better parents

The context of their early lives, in particular the combination of family, peer group and community influences, is a powerful shaper of childrens behavior. There is an obvious connection between positive parenting practices and well-behaved children, and schools are important not least for providing an environment where behavior can be modeled, reinforced and rewarded. So far so elementary. Someti…

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